Friday, 30 August 2013

The Association of Illustrators Awards 2013

The winners of this years newly reformatted AOI Illustration Awards "The Oscars of Illustration"! were announced a few weeks ago. There are several new categories from the old "Images" format reflecting the changing nature of illustration commissioning. Here are the professional category winners you can see the new talent winners on the website (click the title link) as well as the shortlisted works, including Ritwik Das as mentioned a few posts ago. The Category winners and a selection of awarded works will be exhibited at Somerset House in London from the 8th October and will travel to four venues across the UK including Blackpool & Fylde College.

PUBLIC REALM: Jane Reiseger
Title Wayfinding and interior graphics for the new Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia
Use Illustrations were used for interior graphics and way-finding throughout the 8 levels of the hospital.
Commissioner Buro North for the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne


EDITORIAL: Edd Baldry
Title Scouse
Use Illustration for an interview with Tony Crowley, a cultural historian, on the changing accent in Liverpool.
Commissioner Red Pepper Magazine


BOOK: Merav Salomon
Title Frostbites
Use Poetry book written and illustrated by Merav Salomon
Commissioner Tollen Hefte


ADVERTISING: Lesley Barnes 
Title Imagination
Use Poster for the V&A Museum of Childhood
Commissioner AMV BBDO
Client V&A Museum


CHILDREN'S BOOKS: Levi Pinfold
Title Black Dog
Use Picture Book
Publisher Templar Publishing


SELF-INITIATED: Anna Cattermole
Title Reportage of Traditional Wooden Boat Building
UsePersonal project leading to exhibition collaboration with National Maritime Museum


























DESIGN: Jonathan Burton
Title Odd Bods
Use Special Edition Playing Cards
Commissioner Folio Society


KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER: Nicolle Fuller
Title Nanolipogel Attacking Cancer
Commissioner Yale University
Use:Visual showcase for recently published research to evoke interest from the non-science public and describe how nanotechnology might help combat cancer.


















We Have No Art; We do everything as well as we can







Wednesday, 14 August 2013

Sister Mary Corita Kent's 10 Rules for Creativity

Rule 1
FIND A PLACE YOU TRUST AND THEN TRY TRUSTING IT FOR A WHILE.

Rule 2
GENERAL DUTIES OF A STUDENT:
PULL EVERYTHING OUT OF YOUR TEACHER.
PULL EVERYTHING OUT OF YOUR FELLOW STUDENTS.

Rule 3
GENERAL DUTIES OF A TEACHER:
PULL EVERYTHING OUT OF YOUR STUDENTS.

Rule 4
CONSIDER EVERYTHING AN EXPERIMENT.

Rule 5
BE SELF DISCIPLINED. THIS MEANS FINDING SOMEONE WISE OR SMART AND CHOOSING TO FOLLOW THEM.

TO BE DISCIPLINED IS TO FOLLOW IN A GOOD WAY.

TO BE SELF DISCIPLINED IS TO FOLLOW IN A BETTER WAY.

Rule 6
NOTHING IS A MISTAKE. THERE’S NO WIN AND NO FAIL. 
THERE’S ONLY MAKE.

Rule 7
THE ONLY RULE IS WORK.
IF YOU WORK IT WILL LEAD TO SOMETHING.
IT’S THE PEOPLE WHO DO ALL OF THE WORK ALL THE TIME
WHO EVENTUALLY CATCH ON TO THINGS.

Rule 8
DON’T TRY TO CREATE AND ANALYZE AT THE SAME TIME. 
THEY’RE DIFFERENT PROCESSES.

Rule 9
BE HAPPY WHENEVER YOU CAN MANAGE IT.
ENJOY YOURSELF. IT’S LIGHTER THAN YOU THINK.

Rule 10
"WE’RE BREAKING ALL OF THE RULES. EVEN OUR OWN RULES. AND HOW DO WE DO THAT BY LEAVING PLENTY OF ROOM FOR X QUANTITIES." 
JOHN CAGE

HELPFUL HINTS: ALWAYS BE AROUND. COME OR GO TO EVERY- THING. ALWAYS GO TO CLASSES. READ ANYTHING YOU CAN GET YOUR HANDS ON. LOOK AT MOVIES CAREFULLY, OFTEN. SAVE EVERYTHING IT MIGHT COME IN HANDY LATER. 

THERE SHOULD BE NEW RULES NEXT WEEK.


George Grosz The Big No

I just made it in the nick of time to the (now finished) exhibition The Big No by George Grosz at Linden Mill in Hebden Bridge- what a fantastic show (from Hayward Touring Exhibitions) of the work of George Grosz.
Grosz was one of the greatest satirical artists of the 20th century. A founder of the Berlin Dadaist "movement" and a revolutionary left wing artist in the Berlin arts scene of the 1920s, "he depicted the vices and injustices of a deeply divided society." Along with Helmut Herzfeld (who became John Heartfield) he introduced photomontage to the mainstream. Even some of his drawings are composed like photomontages.


Grosz was deeply political and fierce in his depiction of what he saw as a decadent upper class ignorant of the hardships endured by the majority in post WW1 Germany.

'In 1916 I was discharged from military service. The Berlin to which I returned was a cold and grey city. What I saw made me loathe most of my fellow men; everything I could say has been recorded in my drawings. The busy caf├ęs and wine-cellars merely accentuated the gloom of the dark, unheated residential districts. I drew drunkards; puking men; men with clenched fists cursing at the moon; men playing cards on the coffins of the women they had murdered. I drew a man, face filled with fright, washing blood from his hands… I was each one of the characters I drew, the champagne-swilling glutton favoured by fate no less than the poor beggar standing with outstretched hands in the rain. I was split in two, just like society at large…'

The Big No features two portfolios of his drawings Ecce Homo, published in 1923 and Hintergrund in 1928. Ecce Homo was subject of a four year legal case for Grosz and his publisher accused of both pornography and bringing the German military into disrepute. They were acquitted.

The exhibition showed the full range of drawings from these portfolios and it was great to see such powerful, political and graphic works. He is fantastic at the depiction of the pompous self important and ignorant class that ultimately led to the rise of Nazism in the thirties. Bankers, businessmen and politicians...


Indeed Grosz himself was fortunate to escape Germany he left for the US in 1933 the day before the Nazis came to take him. They denounced his work as anti German; seized and destroyed it. As a communist party member he would certainly have ended up in a Concentration Camp had he stayed.

He lived and worked and taught in the States for the remainder of his career and only finally returned to Germany in 1959, he died that same year.